Manta Ray (Mobula birostris)

Also known as Atlantic Manta, Australian Devil Ray, Blanketfish, Devil Fish, Devil Ray, Giant Atlantic Manta, Giant Devil Fish, Giant Devil Ray, Giant Manta, Manta, Pacific Manta, Prince Alfreds Ray, Sea Devil

Description

Also known as Atlantic Manta, Australian Devil Ray, Blanketfish, Devil Fish, Devil Ray, Giant Atlantic Manta, Giant Devil Fish, Giant Devil Ray, Giant Manta, Manta, Pacific Manta, Prince Alfreds Ray, Sea Devil.

Found singly or in small squadrons at cleaning stations, along reef edges and at the surface near coral and rocky reefs as well as in deeper waters.
They feed on plankton and sometimes small fish.
These beautiful creatures are a threatened species.
Length - 900cm
Depth - 0-120m
Circumtropical


They belong to the family of Devil Rays who are identified by head fins, which when rolled up 'look like horns' and when unfurled they act like a funnel for the mouth when feeding on plankton and fish larvae. they are filter feeders,found at cleaning stations, along reef edges and at the surface.

These beautiful graceful rays are huge and awesome to see.
They can leap into the air and give a flat resounding crash as a ton of flesh hits the water. They have no teeth or grinders, no tail stinger, but rely on speed to survive. (From "The Silent World" by Jacques Cousteau)

The first time one of our son's saw this coming towards him when he was snorkelling alone by the dive boat he thought he was "DEAD MEAT"
When we surfaced and then dived down to look he knew he was safe!! Ref: https://www.fishbase.in/summary/2061

1 comment

  1. Posted by @scubasteve
    March 04, 2008 at 04:42 am - 1 person found this useful.

    The best place I've seen these are at Manta Point in the Maldives. Absolutely incredible! Definitely want to be wearing a wet suit though, as the plankton that they like to eat, give you a bit of a stinging!

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