Wedgetail Triggerfish (Rhinecanthus rectangulus)

Also known as Black-banded Triggerfish, Diamond Triggerfish, Patchy Triggerfish, Picasso Triggerfish, Rectangle Triggerfish, Rectangular Triggerfish, Reef Triggerfish, Saddle-shoe Fish, Wedge Picassofish, Wedge Triggerfish, Wedge-tailed Triggerfish

Description

Also known as Black-banded Triggerfish, Diamond Triggerfish, Patchy Triggerfish, Picasso Triggerfish, Rectangle Triggerfish, Rectangular Triggerfish, Reef Triggerfish, Saddle-shoe Fish, Wedge Picassofish, Wedge Triggerfish, Wedge-tailed Triggerfish.

Found singly or in small schools over coral, bare rock and rubble, in shallow surge zones of outer reefs.
They feed on algae, crustaceans, detritus, echinoderms, fish, fish eggs, molluscs, sponges and worms.
Juveniles found over algae reefs.
Very territorial.
Length - 30cm
Depth - 0-20m
Widespread Indo-Pacific

Picasso's dig their shelters under solid objects by swimming sand away. This is done by putting their mouth against a solid object and swim like crazy, thereby creating a current that takes the sand away and making a little nest area.

Wedgetail Triggerfish is known in Hawaii as Huma Huma Trigger, or humu-humu-nuku-nuku-a-puaa by native Hawaiians and has recently been reinstated as the Hawaiian state fish.

Triggerfish have a hard spine Dorsal Fin that can be locked.
When sleeping this spine is used to wedge them into place in a crevasse and so deter predators from pulling them out of their bed!
The spine is also held erect as a warning to other fish to stay away.
Several large Titans blow shallow depressions in the sand for nesting and if approached will raise this spine as a warning, if ignored they may charge, even divers! especially the Titan Triggerfish who will take a tasty bite!! Beware!!! Ref: https://www.fishbase.se/summary/Rhinecanthus-rectangulus

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